Category Archives: Study Abroad Facts

Meet us in Newcastle upon Tyne later this month!

newcastle-study-abroad-event-jan-2017-facebook

We are hosting an open evening for students interested in studying abroad in the next few years.

If you are in the north east of England and would like to learn more, please register for our event online.

We will be joined by representatives of BI Norwegian Business School who will be able to share the experience of their international students.

If you have any questions at all about how to study abroad, this would be an excellent chance for you to get answers. If you are only just starting out on the journey and trying to decide whether this might be something for you, then you are also more than welcome to attend. The event has almost reached capacity so if you are interested in coming along, we advise you to sign up right away.

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under dutch universities, Higher Education, International Higher Education, Student Mobility, study abroad advice, study abroad events, Study Abroad Facts, Uncategorized

Government goes back on its word regarding tuition loan repayment threshold

About four years ago when the new fees regime and related changes to student finance were being announced we took part in a BBC Radio 4 Money Box special edition. One of the other guests was Martin Lewis, money saving expert and, at the time, front man for the government’s campaign to inform the public about the forthcoming changes.

I argued that the changes to student finance were one thing but the payment terms that students would enjoy for the thirty year period after graduation were quite another. It seems that the government has taken the first opportunity it could to go back on its word and amend the terms of repayment and they have backdated these changes to affect everyone who has one of the new loans, even those who have already graduated. Mr Lewis has already made his opinion clear on this act of deception.

The changes announced (that the £21,000 starting point for repayments will not rise in line with inflation) will not have an immediate impact but over the lifetime of most loans it is estimated that the average student will repay an additional £6,000 if the threshold is not increased in the future. This will particularly penalise median earners who are making some repayments but cannot make a significant reduction in the capital of their loan. As no student has yet made any repayment under the new regime I can only speculate that projections for rates of repayment are lower than the worst estimates currently in circulation and the Chancellor is just getting in early with this amendment. How long will it be before 9% of earnings over the threshold becomes 10% or more?

I don’t want this blog to be about the bad hand being dealt English students right now. You can find far better analysis of this elsewhere. However, there can be no doubt that the best advice we can offer students considering a Bachelor’s degree here: have you thought seriously about leaving the country?

Leave a comment

Filed under Student Mobility, study abroad advice, Study Abroad Facts, Uncategorized

City firms not finding what they need in independent school students.

Earlier this week, Mary Curnock Cook, head of Ucas, spoke at the HMC annual conference in St Andrews and suggested that independent schools are preparing students with narrow, almost identical outlooks on life. The necessary conclusion of this being that the life experience of such students does not provide the diversity that successful organisations need in the 21st Century.

Quoted in The Daily Telegraph she said, “It seems to me that not only are (independent school) students going to the same universities that their parents went to, but they are also studying the same subjects that their parents did.

“So I worry about a little sub-section of society which is sleepwalking though an identikit education experience into an off-the-peg life which mirrors what generations of the affluent classes have aspired to.

“The future is not what is used to be – the new sciences, digital economy, digital and creative industries have changed the shape of employment.

“Maybe just maybe some of them should give serious thought to choosing to study something different, somewhere else.”

Where that somewhere else might be is left unstated. I doubt there is much of a case to be made for encouraging able British students, and their aspirational parents,  to go to “lesser” universities in the United Kingdom although it certainly would not harm them to look at a wider range of courses.  The identikit education experience to which she refers can probably be better avoided at universities abroad.

There is plentiful evidence that studying abroad can shape the outlook of any young person and almost always for the better. However, even if independent schools, parents and students are looking for a narrow, evidence-based rationale for choosing a university abroad the recent Times Higher Education World University Rankings can provide this. Although these rankings are largely inappropriate when assessing the quality of these universities’ undergraduate teaching and student support, undeniably they give an indication of overall quality and reputation.

Below we present a snapshot of those universities in the Top 50 in non-English speaking Europe that offer Bachelors degrees in English. Over the last two years, all but two of these universities have seen their overall ranking improve. Perhaps it isn’t all that surprising that more British students are going to study abroad particularly in the Netherlands.  It would seem that City firms might be able find the talent they need in the near future but they will also have to cast their net a little wider when looking for the best talent.

Rank University Country Global Rank Bachelors in English
2 Karolinska Institute Sweden 28 1
5 KU Leuven Belgium 35 4
11 University of Amsterdam Netherlands 58 5
12 University of Utrecht Netherlands 62 3
13 Delft University of Technology Netherlands 65 2
14 Leiden University Netherlands 67 6
15 Erasmus University Netherlands 71 10
17 University of Groningen Netherlands 74 25
22 University of Freiberg Germany 84 1
23 Maastricht University Netherlands 88 10
24 Lund University Sweden 90 5
26 Georg August Universitaet Goettingen Germany 99 1
38 Radboud University Nijmegen Netherlands 130 6
41 Stockholm University Sweden 136 2
46 Aarhus University Denmark 149 4
47 University of Twente Netherlands 149 12
48 VU University Amsterdam Netherlands 154 3

Leave a comment

Filed under dutch universities, International Higher Education, Student Mobility, Study Abroad Facts

What is the Point of 50% Targets for International Student Mobility?

 

Many policy initiatives in the area of international higher education aim to achieve outbound mobility for 50% of all students. The German government has announced a target of 50% of its local students to take part in international education and here in the UK, many universities have announced similar targets, most notably De Montfort University. While it is encouraging to note that such initiatives are usually backed by additional financial support for students (or an acknowledgment that it will be necessary to achieve their goals) there are still a number of problems involved in aiming for such an arbitrary target.

Firstly, what constitutes international experience and is it meaningful in an educational context? To reach this target it will be natural to include all manner of international experience; DMU mentions anything from a four-week language course upwards. While there is almost certainly a benefit to any prolonged period of time abroad, is it sensible to think that this will lead to a greater appreciation of life in another country or indeed anything beyond a cursory evaluation of another culture? The same argument can also apply to a full academic year abroad if it does not allow students to integrate fully into the life of a host university or company, in the case of work experience. For an individual university there is also the issue of managing sufficient partnerships to avoid recreating its own classrooms on foreign soil. In the case of DMU the ultimate plan is to send 11,000 students abroad; this will require a huge number of institutional partners. These arguments are well-known and well-rehearsed amongst professionals in the field of international higher education so does this mean that within every 50% target there is a tacit agreement about how much should be made up of students who go for a full year or more, or those who go for less than a month and how many should go to any one partner university at any one time?

Also, those students who go fully international for their education do not tend to show up in any recorded statistics and can fall between the cracks if they are not registered with an educational institution in their own country and/or receiving government financial support. It could therefore be that the amount of students internationally mobile lies somewhere between 0 and 100% of young people not in domestic higher education or otherwise accounted for.

Secondly, why 50%? Which half of the student population would not benefit from international higher education or couldn’t be persuaded to spend some time abroad? The poorest? The most male?

We spend a huge amount of time advising young people in the United Kingdom on the possibility of studying abroad for all or part of their undergraduate study. While there is undoubtedly a growth in interest and willingness to consider studying abroad I doubt we could say that 50% of young people are enthused by this possibility. Would it not be better to focus on those students who are actually interested in going abroad and providing them with suitable options and/or financial support? A 50% target can only be the result of a governmental or institutional perspective, one that is prescriptive in its attitude to students’ needs. If international higher education is a genuinely good thing, and I firmly believe it is, shouldn’t we just be focussing on helping those students who show an interest rather than shoehorning as many people as necessary into meeting an arbitrary target? If higher education wishes to address an issue relating to international student mobility wouldn’t it be better to target this:

UniSouthDenmark @UniSouthDenmark:
Why this difference? Females account for 63.5% of all people who study abroad while males 36.5%

230614 Uni of Denmark stat

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Higher Education, International Higher Education, International Higher Education Policy, Strategic University Partnerships, Student Mobility, Study Abroad Facts