Tag Archives: guidance for british students

What will happen to British students in the Netherlands if/when Brexit arrives?

calm-down

How do you say “Keep Calm and Carry On” in Dutch?

I was in the Netherlands last week visiting a variety of universities throughout the country. While it was hugely encouraging to see that most universities have increased their number of British enrollments this year, there were certainly signs that one or two had dropped out, citing Brexit as a major concern.

When we are trying to advise students of the impact of Brexit on tuition fees, I think we are more or less clear for every country except the Netherlands. This is the main country where British students benefit from direct subsidy in their host country. We have asked many universities what measures they can put in place to reassure British students in the event that the vote to leave the European Union is actually implemented. While it still isn’t possible for anyone to say what will happen (and expect this state of affairs to continue at least until Article 50 is implemented), I think we can now have a good stab at outlining what will not happen. We can also perhaps point to the worst-case scenario, which from an English point of view may not look so bad after all.

Will students who started university this year be guaranteed EU fees for the duration of their studies on the basis that they have started before any change has been announced? No. Universities have taken legal advice on this and it cannot be done as it would result in discrimination against other non-EU students. Also, universities would be foregoing revenue from central government if it were even legal to do this. Hence, there is absolutely no chance of this happening without the Dutch Ministry of Education taking the lead. There is no suggestion that this will happen. Some in the UK have imagined this might be a possibility because British universities have said they will honour this commitment to their existing EU students (and, more importantly perhaps, the Student Loan Company has said it will do so, too). British universities enjoy greater autonomy when setting fees and, with the exception of STEM subjects, don’t receive direct government subsidy since the introduction of £9,000 fees. For these reasons, this is not a like-for-like comparison.

Could universities decide to charge British students a lower amount than full, non-EU fees? This falls into the same discriminatory problem as the previous scenario. Effectively, this would amount to a blanket scholarship for British students on the grounds that they are British. This isn’t legal and couldn’t be achieved. British students could be able to apply for scholarships offered to non-EU students but they would have no automatic right to them.

Will British students still be able to access tuition fee loans or maintenance loans if we leave the EU? No. This would also end overnight.

To maintain the same fees and access to student finance in the Netherlands would require the UK’s continuing membership of the EU, joining the EEA, or negotiating a separate agreement that would allow for reciprocity. All of these would probably require the maintenance of freedom of movement. As a result, I am not holding my breath.

So, if we are to leave, what would this mean for British students?

Well, the good news is that Dutch tuition fees for international students are not that high anyway. You would be looking at around €8,000 per year for arts and humanities courses, around €12,000 for sciences. The University Colleges would be around €10,000 a year. All of these are comparable with English tuition fees which will resume their own upward journey from September 2017. We have never encouraged students to go to The Netherlands for primarily financial reasons; it has only ever been a nice additional bonus. However, we can accept that this might make it difficult for some British students to afford.

The other major change would affect the rights of British students to live and work in the Netherlands. While there is already talk of making British citizens pay to visit the rest of the EU, we don’t know if this will have an impact on students. We can’t say for certain what the impact would be on British students’ right to work, either. However, the standard allowance for non-EU international students is 10 hours a week, meaning that the maximum earning potential could be seriously restricted.

We will obviously aim to update this information as we know more.

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Do you advise British students on applying to Dutch universities?

If you often find yourself being asked about Dutch universities by your students I would like to suggest you attend our International Higher Education for UK Students conferences that will be held in London on Tuesday 9th June and in Birmingham on Wednesday 10th June. Here is some general advice on how to apply to Dutch universities that may serve as a useful introduction.

1. Choosing the right course

Even though the Netherlands has a wide range of Bachelor’s degrees in English (there are currently 218 listed on our Study in Holland website), it is not possible to find everything. Students may need to widen their search terms to find a degree that is suitable. For example, history is not offered as a single subject Bachelor’s degree in English but European history forms a large part, and can become the main focus, of the BA Liberal Arts and Sciences offered at Tilburg University.

Every year there are more options in English and we are already aware of several courses that will launch in 2016 and 2017 so it is always worth checking our site for updates.

2. Choosing the right university

The most important distinction when considering Dutch universities relates to the aptitudes and aspirations of your students; is a research university more suitable than a University of Applied Sciences? This distinction is starting to become a little more blurred but it is still largely true that students will either follow a vocational/professional or academic path in their higher education.

While Dutch research universities such as Tilburg or the University of Groningen are generally reckoned to be amongst the best in the world, we believe it is the Universities of Applied Sciences that are comparatively better than their equivalents in the UK, primarily because of the learning opportunities they offer outside the classroom and library. The business school at the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, for example, offers excellent work experience opportunities in many of the world’s leading companies. Windesheim Honours College can offer globally minded students the chance to get involved in humanitarian projects in many countries.

3. Meeting Dutch entry requirements 

In common with many European education systems, students are eligible to apply with extremely modest A’ level or IB scores. However, an increasing number of courses have their own selection criteria. Even so, we would advise you to set your own unofficial entry requirements; allowing unsuitable students to apply is almost certainly going to lead to an unpleasant experience further down the line.

For research universities we would suggest BBB or 34 on the IB should be the minimum expected grades.

For Universities of Applied Sciences students require 2 A’ levels and four GCSEs in six different subjects. BTECs in related subjects will also be considered. For students with three A’ levels they may be able to enter a fast track programme that can be completed in three years (including up to a year’s work experience). Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences offers one such example. Stenden University of Applied Sciences media and hospitality degrees can also be completed in three years for the right students.

4. Applying to Dutch universities

If you have ever had any first-hand experience of Studielink you will know that it can be somewhat counter-intuitive, particularly if you are used to the Ucas system. While we would never claim to be experts in this part of the process, we know lots of people who are. By now, most Dutch universities admissions staff will be able to assist you with the typical difficulties that might emerge. The University of Groningen in particular has amassed quite some experience in this area.

While we can only scratch the surface in a blog post you might be interested to learn that all of the examples we have given above will be represented at our International HE conferences next month in London and Birmingham.

Participating Dutch Universities

Tilburg University

University of Groningen

Windesheim Honours College (London only)

Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences (London only)

Stenden University of Applied Sciences

A further six universities from France, Italy, Spain, USA and Australia will also be attending, allowing you the opportunity to learn about more than just the Dutch way of doing things.

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